Asking for help in the home environment.

Asking for help is our way to indicate that we can’t do something on our own – that we need someone. If we were unable to ask for help, many parts in our day to day life would be extremely difficult. 

 

How can I encourage my child to ask me for help?

Asking for help is our way to indicate that we can’t do something on our own – that we need someone. If we were unable to ask for help, many parts in our day to day life would be extremely difficult. 

Imagine our young children? They need help much more than we do in order to do simple things like eat, drink, have a bath or even play games! Studies show that asking for help falls under the problem solving skills that we develop in our brains. It can help promote positive thinking and give our children a boost of confidence! Sometimes there is a stigma that asking for help means you aren’t good enough or incapable of doing something yourself. But we need to show our children that it is ok to approach us and ask for help. 

What can I do as a parent?

Simple things can be done to encourage our children to ask for help, such as: 

  1. Letting them know you are there by saying, “I am here if you need me. You can let me know if you need help.”
  2. Asking them if they need help, “Do you need my help?”
  3. Talking about ‘helping’ in a positive manner to lessen the stigma
  4. Showing your child that everybody needs help sometimes, including you!

What if my child isn't using much language? How do I encourage them to ask for my help?

Asking for help doesn’t have to happen in spoken language. If your child is communicating in different ways such as eye gaze, gestures, or visuals, you can encourage them to use these behaviours to ask for your help. This can be done through:
 

1.    Changing the environment to encourage them to seek you (e.g., instead of having the water bottle on the table, keep it out of their reach so they need help to reach it)
2.    Waiting for your child to approach you instead of running towards them as soon as we see they need help (even though it can be very hard!). 

This means they have to employ problem solving skills to recognise that they can come to you and ask for help, whether it is through lending you a toy, looking at you and then at an object, pointing or showing you. 

What kind of changes will I see as a parent?

The kinds of changes you will see in your child include a burst of confidence in themselves, as well as in you as their carer. Your child will grow up understanding what a healthy collaboration between children and adults should be, and this will be beneficial for them especially in the school/pre-school environment with their teachers. 

Here at Speech in Focus, we can support you by showing you ways to adjust the home environment as well as your behaviour to encourage your child to interact with you and ask for help. 

By Thea Boutros
info@speechinfocus.com.au
02 8065 1197

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