How to get my child to interact with me.

Take time to observe, wait and listen to your child. When you are asking your child too many questions, you might not be able to know when your child is trying to communicate with you

 

Why is my child not interested in what I’m saying? My child loves playing alone, they don't listen to me and don't like to play with me. 

Do these situations sound familiar to you? Do you find it tricky to interact with your child?

Here are some tips that can help you:

Take time to observe, wait and listen to your child. When you are asking your child too many questions, you might not be able to know when your child is trying to communicate with you. 

Give yourself time to sit back, watch and wait. There may be some subtle and tiny moments where they are trying to initiate interactions with you. For example, they may reach out for your hand to grab something or bring you something to open or play with. 

Pay close attention to their body language - what they are looking, pointing at, and where they are bringing you to, you can open up opportunities for communication. They may be asking for some food, a toy or asking for your help. They may be inviting you to join their play. 

When interacting with young children, waiting is an important skill. Waiting gives you time to observe what your child might do or say. Pay close attention to the amount of time it takes for your child to initiate an interaction. It is common for children with communication difficulties to require more time to process and respond to what you’re trying to tell them. Sometimes it may take up to 10 seconds! 

Make the interaction as fun as possible! Young children will be more tuned in when you make your conversation or play interesting and engaging! Use a lot of expressions and be animated! What you talk about doesn’t matter as much as how you talk about it.

Finally, it is important to listen to what your child is trying to say. Your child may say ‘dee’ when they look at a puppy. We know that they are talking about the puppy because it is where they are looking at or pointing to. We can then easily interpret it and respond to them by saying ‘puppy’. This acknowledges the message your child is trying to convey as well as helping your child to actually learn the word. Your child can then understand how interactions work and that they are able to use their voice to communicate with you.

By the Speech in Focus Team
info@speechinfocus.com.au
02 8065 1197

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